Sales & Marketing Tricks Other Window Companies Use

Here Are The Most Common Bogus & Underhanded Tactics Homeowners Run Into When Replacing Their Windows.

BY JOHN KOLBASKA, OWNER

As you may or may not know, Staten Island and New Jersey window companies have a bad rap when it comes to sales and marketing. And this reputation follows around even the upright, honest window companies like stink on a donkey.

So today, I want to expose some of the most common sales and marketing tactics in the industry. As you’re shopping for replacement windows, you’ll no doubt come across at least a few of these. But after reading this article, you’ll be equipped with the knowledge to spot and protect yourself from them.

Let’s get started…

#1: Those “$189” Replacement Windows

This is THE ultimate bait-and-switch marketing tactic. Here’s how it works:

  • The window company advertises a $189 price to get you to set the appointment.
  • During said appointment, you discover the windows are complete and total junk—a small 24×36 double hung with basic glass and no low-e coating.
  • To get even average size and quality windows, you find you’ll have to add numerous upgrades.
  • You also receive what we call Caulk & Walk Installation that the company subcontracts out to the lowest bidder. This is the most haphazard and barebones installation you can get.

What you end up with is a substandard window that costs you 3 to 5 times more than you expected!

#2: Quotes That Don’t Tell The Full Story

You can read about a real-life example of this trick here, but the concept is simple. A window company will quote you a lower price for what you think are the same windows. When the actual replacement occurs, only then do you discover the windows are actually an inferior version of what the company with the higher quote offered.

This also happens with window installation. A company will tell you it can replace your windows for an extremely low price. The problem is that the company—to achieve such a dirt-cheap quote—skimps on quality ancillary materials and crucial installation steps.

#3: The Ol’ Cardiac Quote

This is when a window salesperson quotes an initial price so absurdly high that your heart skips a beat. This is common in window installation and 100% intentional to freak you out and make you think, “Wait, what? I can’t afford that!!!”

But don’t worry—the salesperson then lowers their voice and says something along the lines of, “Good news, though. Because of X, Y, and Z, I can secure a special price just for YOU today!”

Then with the whisk of a pen, they apply “discounts” and typically reduce this cardiac pricing by 30 – 50%. What they aren’t telling you, though, is that these discounted prices are actually the standard par prices for their windows in the first place.

#4: Manager-Approved Discounts

This one is so lame and transparent it’s surprising that Staten Island and New Jersey window companies still use it.

If you balk at the company’s initial quote, the salesperson gets on the phone with a manager to “fight tooth and nail” to win you a lower price. Then they’ll return—exhausted from battle—to tell you their manager wasn’t happy, but approved a one-time price reduction just for you because, after all, you’re so special!

Don’t buy it—literally or figuratively. Window companies and their salespeople rehearse this stuff ad nauseum with a focus on volume sales, not customer service or quality installations.

#5: Quotes Good For 30 Days Or “Today Only”

What a difference 30 days can make. In that time, a window company’s prices—for whatever reason—will become outdated and you’ll have to pay more for the same windows you got a quote for a month ago.

At least, that’s what window companies want you to believe… which explains why so many say quotes are good for 30, 60, or 120 days. If you don’t buy within that time frame, the price skyrockets.

But here’s the million-dollar question: Why?

What changes in that time frame?

Answer: Absolutely nothing. This limited-time quote is simply meant to get you to buy as quickly as possible. (Are you sensing a pattern here?)

#6: The Doorknob Close (“Can You Help Me?”)

Another classic, The Doorknob Close defines “old school.”

Here’s how it works:

The salesperson does their pitch and gives you a price.

You tell them you’ll think it over, to which they at first seem to agree and get up to go.

With one hand on the doorknob, they stop and say, “Before I go, there’s one small problem I need your help with.…”

Uh-oh

They’ll then launch into a dreadful spiel about how they’ve spent more time with you than their family that day, or how they honestly thought you liked the product and seemed so interested.

Then they’ll hit you with the clincher: “What needs to happen to get this problem fixed for you today?”

The exact phrasing here is important. This isn’t a “yes or no” question. It’s worded to make you respond with what it would take to get you to buy right then and there. It’s meant to get you to convince yourself to sign on the dotted line on the spot.

#7: The Neighborhood Discount

This is a marketing tactic where a company will knock on your door and tell you they’re doing work on a nearby home. The company will say they’ll provide you with a discount while they’re working in the area and that the discount is only valid until the company finishes the other project. If you don’t book an appointment with them before that, you miss out on the discount.

Companies frame the Neighborhood Discount as a way for YOU to save THEM money. They’ll say since they’re already in the area doing a job, they’ll save on travel costs by doing projects nearby. As a result, they are able to offer you a reduced price while they’re in your neighborhood.

The truth is that, unless you’re letting them sleep on your futon, they’re not actually saving on travel costs. They still have to drive to the neighborhood every day. And even if they were doing a job for your next-door neighbor, it’s not like the same crew would be working your job and your neighbor’s job at the exact same time.

Bottom line: The Neighborhood Discount is yet another attempt to pressure you to set an appointment immediately. In reality, the discount isn’t an actual discount—the company is either inflating their prices like we spoke about above, or they are outright lying.

#8: Window Trade-In

Trade-in programs work for things like vehicles, video games, and cars. You trade in your used item, make some money out of it, and whoever you traded it in to gets to sell the item. Win-win.

What trade-in programs don’t work for? Windows.

Windows can’t be reinstalled on someone else’s home. So if a window company advertises a trade-in special on your old windows, be suspicious. They can’t actually use your old windows, so there is no financial benefit for cutting you a deal when you trade them in. This is a marketing gimmick—just more promotional spin that likely won’t save you money.

No Games, No Gimmicks Window Quotes In Staten Island & New Jersey

At the end of the day, all of these sales and marketing tactics are designed to trick you into believing you’re getting a great deal. Most of these tactics involve artificially inflating the list price and then dropping to the normal price to make it seem like you’re saving money. It would be like a grocery store that normally sells a gallon of milk for $2.99 marking up the price to $4.99 during a promotional event and “discounting” it for $2.99. You’re not actually saving anything!

If you’re reading this because you need replacement windows in the Staten Island and New Jersey areas, avoid all this mess and contact us. We’ll respect you and your time, educate on the right solution, and put the decision in YOUR hands. If you choose us, great! If you need time to think things over… great! We’ll be here when you need us.

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